A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
* * * * *

TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE: Every effort has been made to replicate this text as
faithfully as possible; please see detailed list of printing issues at
the end of the text.

* * * * *




ADMIRAL FARRAGUT




Great Commanders

_EDITED BY JAMES GRANT WILSON_

* * * * *

The Great Commanders Series.

EDITED BY GENERAL JAMES GRANT WILSON.

Admiral Farragut. By Captain A. T. Mahan, U. S. N.
General Taylor. By General O. O. Howard, U. S. A.
General Jackson. By James Parton.
General Greene. By Captain Francis V. Greene, U. S. A.
General J. E. Johnston. By Robert M. Hughes, of Virginia.
General Thomas. By Henry Coppee, LL. D.
General Scott. By General Marcus J. Wright.
General Washington. By General Bradley T. Johnson.
General Lee. By General Fitzhugh Lee.
General Hancock. By General Francis J. Walker.
General Sheridan. By General Henry E. Davies.
General Grant. By General James Grant Wilson.



_IN PREPARATION._

General Sherman. By General Manning F. Force.
Admiral Porter. By James R. Soley, late Assist. Sec. of Navy.
General McClellan. By General Peter S. Michie.
Commodore Paul Jones. By Admiral Richard W. Meade.

New York: D. APPLETON & CO., 72 Fifth Avenue.

* * * * *

[Illustration: D. G. Farragut]

D. Appleton & Co.

* * * * *

GREAT COMMANDERS




ADMIRAL FARRAGUT

BY CAPTAIN A. T. MAHAN, U. S. NAVY

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES NAVAL WAR COLLEGE
AUTHOR OF THE GULF AND INLAND WATERS, AND OF
THE INFLUENCE OF SEA POWER UPON HISTORY, 1660-1783


_WITH PORTRAIT AND MAPS_


NEW YORK
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
1897

* * * * *

Copyright, 1892,
By D. APPLETON AND COMPANY.
_All rights reserved._

Electrotyped and Printed
at the Appleton Press, U.S.A.

* * * * *




PREFACE.


In preparing this brief sketch of the most celebrated of our naval
heroes, the author has been aided by the very full and valuable
biography published in 1878 by his son, Mr. Loyall Farragut, who has
also kindly supplied for this work many additional details of interest
from the Admiral's journals and correspondence, and from other
memoranda. For the public events connected with Farragut's career,
either directly or indirectly, recourse has been had to the official
papers, as well as to the general biographical and historical literature
bearing upon the war, which each succeeding year brings forth in books
or magazines. The author has also to express his thanks to Rear-Admiral
Thornton A. Jenkins, formerly chief-of-staff to Admiral Farragut; to
Captain John Crittenden Watson, formerly his flag-lieutenant; and to his
friend General James Grant Wilson, for interesting anecdotes and
reminiscences.

A. T. M.


* * * * *




CONTENTS.


CHAPTER PAGE

I.--Family and Early Life, 1801-1811 1

II.--Cruise of the Essex, 1811-1814 10

III.--Midshipman to Lieutenant, 1814-1825 51

IV.--Lieutenant, 1825-1841 69

V.--Commander and Captain, 1841-1860 89

VI.--The Question of Allegiance, 1860-1861 106

VII.--The New Orleans Expedition, 1862 115

VIII.--The First Advance on Vicksburg, 1862 177

IX.--The Blockade, and the Passage of Port Hudson, 1862-1863 196

X.--Mobile Bay Fight, 1864 237

XI.--Later Years and Death, 1864-1870 294

XII.--The Character of Admiral Farragut 308




LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
FACING
PAGE

Portrait of Admiral Farragut _Frontispiece_

General Map of the scene of Farragut's operations 115

Passage of Mississippi Forts 127

Passage of Vicksburg Batteries 187

Passage of Port Hudson 213

Battle of Mobile Bay 247


* * * * *




ADMIRAL FARRAGUT.




CHAPTER I.

FAMILY AND EARLY LIFE.

1801-1811.


The father of Admiral Farragut, George Farragut, was of unmixed Spanish
descent, having been born on the 29th of September, 1755, in the island
of Minorca, one of the Balearic group, where the family had been
prominent for centuries. One of his ancestors, Don Pedro Ferragut,
served with great distinction under James I, King of Aragon, in the wars
against the Moors, which resulted in their expulsion from Majorca in
1229, and from the kingdom of Valencia, in the Spanish Peninsula, in
1238. As Minorca in 1755 was a possession of the British Crown, to which
it had been ceded in 1713 by the Treaty of Utrecht, George Farragut was
born under the British flag; but in the following year a French
expedition, fitted out in Toulon, succeeding in wresting from the hands
of Great Britain both the island and its excellent fortified harbor,
Port Mahon, one of the most advantageous naval stations in the
Mediterranean. It was in the course of the operations which resulted in
this conquest of Minorca by the French that the British fleet, under
the command of Admiral Byng, met with the check for which the admiral
paid the penalty of his life a few months later. At the close of the
Seven Years' War, in 1763, the island was restored to Great Britain, in
whose hands it remained until 1782, when it was again retaken by the
French and Spaniards.

George Farragut, however, had long before severed his connection with
his native country. In March, 1776, he emigrated to North America, which
was then in the early throes of the Revolutionary struggle. Having grown
to manhood a subject to Great Britain, but alien in race and feeling, he
naturally espoused the cause of the colonists, and served gallantly in
the war. At its end he found himself, like the greater part of his
adopted countrymen, called to the task of building up his own fortunes,
neglected during its continuance; and, by so doing, to help in restoring
prosperity to the new nation. A temper naturally adventurous led him to
the border lines of civilization; and it was there, in the region where
North Carolina and eastern Tennessee meet, that the years succeeding the
Revolution appear mainly to have been passed. It was there also that he
met and married his wife, Elizabeth Shine, a native of Dobbs County,
North Carolina, where she was born on the 7th of June, 1765. At the time
of their marriage the country where they lived was little more than a
wilderness, still infested by Indians; and one of the earliest
recollections of the future admiral was being sent into the loft, on the
approach of a party of these, while his mother with an axe guarded the
door, which she had barricaded. This unsettled and dangerous condition
necessitated a constant state of preparedness, with some organization
of the local militia, among whom George Farragut held the rank of a
major of cavalry, in which capacity he served actively for some time.

While resident in Tennessee, George Farragut became known to Mr. W. C.
C. Claiborne, at that time the member for Tennessee in the National
House of Representatives. Mr. Claiborne in 1801 became governor of
Mississippi Territory; and in 1803, when the United States purchased
from France the great region west of the Mississippi River, to which the
name Louisiana was then applied, he received the cession of the newly
acquired possession. This was soon after divided into two parts by a
line following the thirty-third parallel of north latitude, and
Claiborne became governor of the southern division, which was called the
Territory of Orleans. To this may probably be attributed the removal of
the Farraguts to Louisiana from eastern Tennessee. The region in which
the latter is situated, remote both from tide-water and from the great
river by which the Western States found their way to the Gulf of Mexico,
was singularly unfitted to progress under the conditions of
communication in that day; and it long remained among the most backward
and primitive portions of the United States. The admiral's father, after
his long experience there, must have seen that there was little hope of
bettering his fortunes. Whatever the cause, he moved to Louisiana in the
early years of the century, and settled his family in New Orleans. He
himself received the appointment of sailing-master in the navy, and was
ordered to command a gun-boat employed in the river and on the adjacent
sounds. A dispute had arisen between the United States and the Spanish
Government, to whom the Floridas then belonged, as to the line of
demarcation between the two territories; and George Farragut was at
times employed with his vessel in composing disturbances and forwarding
the views of his own government.

David Glasgow, the second son of George Farragut, and the future Admiral
of the United States Navy, was born before the removal to Louisiana, on
the 5th of July, 1801, at Campbell's Station, near Knoxville, in eastern
Tennessee. In 1808, while living in his father's house on the banks of
Lake Pontchartrain, an incident occurred which led directly to his
entrance into the navy, and at the same time brought into curious
coincidence two families, not before closely associated, whose names are
now among the most conspicuous of those in the annals of the navy.



Pages: | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.